economy, retirement, risk management

Psychology and the Market

On Monday February 24th 2020 the Dow dropped over 1000 points in a single day.

 

Human behavior is driven two forces, fight or flight. When facing a dramatic event we as individuals are forced to REACT to what happens. 

When looking at the market, if a person is underinvested and it goes up day after day making new highs, that person may experience FOMO… fear of missing out. They might make the decision to invest based on emotion instead of fundamentals.

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income, retirement, Taxes

RMD: What are the Risks and How Can We Address Them?

Several recent studies show peoples number one fear is running out of money during retirement.

To prepare us for retirement the government gives workers the ability to set up qualified accounts in order to save for retirement and get tax deferred growth. By deferring taxes money saved can grow faster. You put money away, not paying taxes now, but paying taxes on the money when you pull it out during retirement.

When you get to retirement, you can start pulling money from your account. In the past it has been considered good practice to not draw more than 4% from an account during retirement in order to make sure you don’t outlive your money. In the past bond yields have been 5-7% and that makes a 4% draw down possible. Now over the past 5 years bond yields have been around 2-3% and because many retirees rely on bonds to deliver income to their portfolio, many economists and advisors have been advising clients to withdraw less from their IRAs; this is so retirees don’t run out of money when they are older.

Now what if I told you there was a government program that requires you to draw more income from your account, without any consideration for how long you or your spouse will live, and without regard for whether you will run out of money or not.

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disability, health, protection, risk management

Deaths of Despair

In recent months companies at the center of the Opioid Crisis have been fighting in court about the roles they played in the epidemic that has affected millions of Americans. The over prescription of highly addictive drugs has had severe impacts on families, businesses, and the economy as a whole. (1) But the Opioid Crisis is only part of a much larger problem facing American Society.

In March of 2017 a landmark study was released connecting opioid abuse, financial security and death rates in the United States. The information is sobering and should be the focus of policy changes at all levels of government.

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disability, economy, health, life insurance, protection, retirement, risk management

Women and Financial Security

In 2018, the government of Iceland passed a law making it illegal to pay women less than men. (1) 

According to a World Economic Forum report, “At the current pace, gender gaps can potentially be closed in 54 years in Western Europe… and in 151 years in North America (reflecting lack of progress in the region this year).” (2)

A recent study by Economic Policy Institute found that women earn 74 cents for every $1 earned by a man with similar education and experience. This wage gap has always existed and is disturbing in a society founded upon equality and justice. (3)

This wage gap has important implications for women and their financial security, especially during retirement. 

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AI, disability, economy, life insurance, new economy, protection, retirement

Jobs at Risk

A recent study by McKinsey Global Institute examined how robotics will affect labor and the economy. The study estimated that 800 million jobs (1/5 of all jobs) will be impacted by advances in robotics. (1)

Among the jobs most impacted include brokers, accountants, office staff, machine operators, and food service. Lower skilled, repetitive tasks are most likely to be replaced.

What does this mean for family finances in the years to come?

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