AI, disability, economy, life insurance, new economy, protection, retirement

Jobs at Risk

A recent study by McKinsey Global Institute examined how robotics will affect labor and the economy. The study estimated that 800 million jobs (1/5 of all jobs) will be impacted by advances in robotics. (1)

Among the jobs most impacted include brokers, accountants, office staff, machine operators, and food service. Lower skilled, repetitive tasks are most likely to be replaced.

What does this mean for family finances in the years to come?

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economy, life insurance, new economy, protection, retirement, risk management

How to Deal with Being Laid Off: 5 Strategies To Prepare For Job Change

Each day we read reports that the economy is booming.

“U.S. housing and consumer are strong” (1)

“Factory output is poised to speed up.”

“Stronger global growth expectations and a weaker dollar should help.”

“The stock market hits record highs…”

With that being the case, you might find it surprising that several large corporations have recently announced they will be laying off large numbers of employees, especially managers.

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AI, Climate change, economy, new economy, retirement, risk management

The Work of Nations: 30 Years On…

When I first read “The Work of Nations” by Robert Reich in the mid-1990s I had almost no background in macroeconomics. (1) But in reading it, Reich was able to effectively describe how radically the economic system was changing as a result of Globalization. Reich at the time was Bill Clinton’s Secretary of Labor and a key member of his economic team.

As context, China’s economy in 1991 was $400 billion compared to $6,174 billion for the US. China entered the global trade organizations in 1992. Today China’s economy is $14 trillion compared to $21 trillion for the US.

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health, life insurance, new economy, protection

Job Change, Group Life Insurance and Russian Roulette

In the United States, there is a huge number of households which are unprotected or under protected by Life Insurance. In a recent LIMRA study 7 in 10 households believe would be in serious financial distress if an adult in the household passed away. (1)

37 million households have no life insurance.
Another 33 million households do not have sufficient life insurance to count themselves as protected.

One vehicle that many people rely upon for protection is Group Life Insurance. When offered as a company benefit, it can inexpensively provide protection for many people… but it only does so while the insured works for the company.

Currently, 1 in 5 people are only covered by Group Life Insurance.

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economy, entrepreneurship, new economy

“Morning in America…”

I was driving into work today and a Chevy Volt sped by me. Yesterday a Fisker Karma was parked in front of my office. In Q2 of 2019 Tesla produced over 72,000 cars, including the mass production version Model3.

Technology is bringing a renaissance to American manufacturing. (1) New industries and new job descriptions are being created, even as “old economy” jobs become antiquated and outsourced to robots. (2)

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economy, new economy, risk management

Management Flaws in Corporate America

The most recent rounds of corporate earnings reports for retail companies has by and large been very disappointing. Many companies are struggling to survive in an environment dominated by a few large ecommerce companies. (1)

Disappointing earnings have resulted in lowered outlooks and fallen stock prices of many retail companies. (2)

I recently had the opportunity to talk to several people who work in corporate America, particularly retail. What I learned is scary.

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Climate change, economy, environment, health, new economy, Socially Responsible Investing, SRI

Pending Meat Tax Could Change Economic Behavior

In recent weeks plant-based meat products have made real inroads into many popular restaurant chains. Many plant-based brands have developed models that make them cost competitive and flavor competitive with animal-based meat products.

Animal-based meats have been criticized on several levels. The role that CAFOs (concentrated animal farming operations) play in deforestation, methane release, pollution and accelerating climate change. In addition, several recent studies have shown that meat products have many negative health consequences, including cancer. (1)

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economy, new economy, risk management

New Employment Realities As Recession Risks Rise

“I’VE BEEN LET GO…”

It’s a terrifying experience… being fired or laid off from a job you have done well for a number of years. It seems daily that you see headlines of such announcements.

While the monthly jobs numbers are heralded as a sign of a strong economy there are undercurrents of weakness. More than half of all American’s have little or no savings.(1) Many companies report a weakening expectation for revenue and growth.(2) CEOs are concerned about the effects the trade war and it has caused many companies to delay capital investments and expansion.(3)

Many analysts have already indicated that Europe is in a recession. Some expect a recession in the US within the next 6 to 12 months.(4)

With that being the case, it pays to be prepared and understand what unemployment means in this new economic environment.

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AI, economy, new economy, retirement

Productivity and Robots

For decades the US economy has suffered from stagnant wages and stifled productivity. While the economy has grown in GDP since 1970 growing from $1 trillion to $18.5 trillion in 2016 and $20.513 trillion in 2018, the American worker has not enjoyed commensurate benefits. Wages have remained flat for decades. 

In the past, studies have shown that part of the reason for this was the development of the computer and its influence on businesses improving efficiency. 

In a new study from London’s Center for Economic Research, the analysis offered by George Graetz and Guy Michaels of Uppsala University and the London School of Economics, respectively, offers some of the first rigorous macroeconomic research and finds that industrial robots have been a substantial driver of labor productivity and economic growth. (1)

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Climate change, economy, environment, ESG, new economy, risk management, Socially Responsible Investing, SRI

David Hume, “State of Nature” and Climate Change

When you examine the behavior of corporations today you begin to wonder… Is there a moral philosophical underpinning to their behavior? What determines right and wrong? And in an age of anthropogenic climate change what is the responsibility of business to the larger society?

I decided to revisit the philosophy of David Hume and see if I could scrape together some clues to better understand what we are experiencing. Hume was an English philosopher in the 18th century. Along with John Locke, Hume wrote several treatises that became the foundation of philosophical thought in England, but also importantly, for the United States. Hume’s insights can be found in the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution. As a result, his thinking played a crucial role in the development of business and industry, and the policies that supported their development.

To understand how government developed and the role it played in regulating behavior, Hume and others described an original condition (prior to government) he called the “State of Nature”.

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